Singapore Cautions The Public Against Using Ultraviolet-C Disinfection Equipment Within Homes Citing UV Radiation Issues

source – CDC
  • Households should avoid using ultraviolet-C (UVC) disinfection equipment in their homes due to the absence of safety safeguards that protect users from UV radiation exposure, according to Singapore’s National Environment Agency (NEA).

  • UVC radiation exposure caused by improper usage or dangerous sterilisers might result in damage to eyes and skin among others.

Singapore Cautions The Public Against Using Ultraviolet-C Disinfection Equipment Within Homes Citing UV Radiation Issues

SINGAPORE: Households should avoid using ultraviolet-C (UVC) disinfection equipment in their homes due to the absence of safety safeguards that protect users from UV radiation exposure, the country’s National Environment Agency (NEA) advised Tuesday (Nov 23).

To avoid inadvertent exposure and health dangers, the Singapore government agency recommended the public not to purchase any UVC steriliser without safety safeguards.

UVC-based disinfection, it noted, should be used only in industrial or commercial settings with suitable safety features and procedures.

These gadgets are often used to sterilise mobile phones, jewellery, and household surfaces.

source - asia one

UVC radiation exposure caused by improper usage or dangerous sterilisers might result in eye or skin damage. These include corneal damage, which results in burning sensations and light sensitivity, as well as burns that result in redness and skin peeling.

“Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, there has been a growing demand for and availability of UVC disinfection devices,” NEA mentioned in its advisory.

Households purchasing such sterilisers for disinfection purposes should ensure that they have safety engineering features that protect users from UVC radiation exposure.

For example, motion sensors in portable, tube, and desk lamps, as well as bulbs, automatically turn off UVC sources whenever an individual approaches it, and gravity sensors in handheld UVC sterilisers and portable UVC wands automatically turn off UVC sources when the devices face upward, protecting the user’s eyes.

For UVC disinfection boxes, safety mechanisms that cut off the UVC light when the box is opened should be included.

The NEA urged users to avoid direct skin contact with UVC radiation and to avoid staring directly at a UVC light source.

Additionally, it recommended anybody who has purchased a UVC steriliser without any safety safeguards to immediately cease using it, particularly if it is meant for use on the skin.

“NEA has been working with major retailers to actively remove listings of UVC sterilisers that are unsafe and pose a risk of exposure to UVC radiation,” it added.

“All physical stores and online sales platforms have been advised not to sell UVC steriliser products that are unsafe for consumers.”

Approximately 8,000 listings for dangerous UVC sterilisers have been removed from online marketplaces.

NEA noted that Amazon, Carousell, ezbuy, Qoo10, and Shopee had been aggressively removing those identified from their platforms, and urged other online sales operators to do likewise.

The NEA’s rules on UVC sterilisers are available on the organisation’s website.

Total
0
Shares
Previous Post

Stricter Movement Control Order To Be Implemented If Cases Worsen Says Khairy

Next Post

Malaysia Has To Reopen Safely Says Khairy

Related Posts
Total
0
Share