Malaysia In No Rush To Vaccinate Children Under 12 Without Sufficient Data

source – stanford childrens health

Children are a low-risk group, so why should we subject the children to vaccination when we are still unsure as to whether it is safe and effective. – Dr Nordin (Founder of Malaysian Doctors Club)

Malaysia In No Rush To Vaccinate Children Under 12 Without Sufficient Data

Experts have backed the government’s decision to wait for the results of studies and gather sufficient evidence on the efficacy and safety of the COVID-19 vaccination for children under the age of 12 before vaccinating the group, calling it a sensible choice.

Dr Muhammad Hakim Nordin, founder of the Malaysian Doctors Club (MDC), said Health Minister Khairy Jamaluddin’s choice not to make a quick judgement on the issue was also sensible.

“…they (children) are a low-risk group…then why should we subject the children to something (vaccination) that we are still not sure whether it is safe and effective.”

“As far as I know, the WHO (World Health Organisation) has yet to recommend vaccination for children under 12,” in a statement with Bernama.

Although several vaccine manufacturers have verified the safety and efficacy of their vaccines, Dr Muhammad Hakim said that it was up to the WHO to decide whether the vaccinations were safe for children under the age of 12.

Khairy earlier said that discussions were underway with a vaccine manufacturer to obtain the COVID-19 vaccination for children under the age of 12. The company is prepared to submit relevant data to every governing body in the world, including Malaysia.

Meanwhile, Dr Adli Ali, senior clinical lecturer and consultant paediatric immunologist at Tuanku Muhriz Chancellor’s Hospital, said he thought the government was evaluating several vaccinations to be given to the group.

He said that having sufficient data will give the parents more confidence in allowing their children to be vaccinated.

“I believe that they (the government) have also taken into account some data (from various vaccine producers) including Sinovac which has released data saying that the vaccine is safe for children aged 6 to 12,” he said.

source - UNICEF

Meanwhile, clinical microbiologist specialist Assoc Prof Dr Nurul Azmawati Mohamed of Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (Usim) said that choosing whether or not to vaccinate children under the age of 12 was not an easy task.

She said that, although clinical studies have proven that the vaccine is safe and effective for children in other countries, the test report should be evaluated by WHO and Health Ministry specialists.

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